Sites & Services

Why I Still Use Jango

Radio Airplay

Jango offers free Pandora-style internet radio. Type in an artist’s name and it generates a playlist of related songs. Jango Airplay lets artists buy their way into the recommendation engine, promising guaranteed airplay alongside your pick of big names.

I’ve been running Jango campaigns pretty much continuously since the service launched in March of 2009. My songs have been played 270,000 times, 23% of which were unpaid “organic” plays. It cost me $1841.50 out of my own pocket, plus at least that much in affiliate earnings from my previous articles on the topic.

What’s my return on that investment? There’s no way to know.

Jango reports 25,000 likes and 9800 fans, but those terms have little meaning. A like on Jango is a simple thumbs-up that has nothing to do with Facebook, and most of those “fans” are unreachable. An average of one email address per day has been shared with me since that feature launched in early 2010, but those 700 email addresses alone don’t justify the expense.

Jango Airplay

The reason I stick with it is because I’ve seen so many Jango listeners become genuine fans. They friend me on Facebook, reply to my email updates, comment on my YouTube videos, and yes, buy my music. With the possible exception of Facebook Ads, I’m convinced Jango is the best passive promotion out there.

Others are skeptical. This site’s top Google search term is “jango airplay scam.” Some suggest that while the service does what it claims to do, any form of pay-for-play is payola (I address that argument here). Conspiracy theorists claim that the entire service is a fraud, and that the comments and realtime listener feed are faked (despite the fact that many comments clearly apply to a particular song, and that you can message listeners directly from the feed).

Jango could go a long way towards dispelling these concerns by finally fixing the weakest aspect of the service: artist-to-fan communication.

When I send out a mass email to 9800 fans, I typically get only one or two responses. With a response rate of 0.0002%, it’s natural to wonder if anyone is really out there.

The problem is that the listener’s inbox is tucked away in a drop-down menu. The vast majority of Jango users almost certainly don’t realize they have an inbox.

I suggest Jango eliminate all social networking features and share new fans’ email addresses by default, unless a box is unchecked. Then add a full-featured fan management system like ReverbNation’s FanReach, with an export function and full analytics including open and clickthrough rates.

While I’m making suggestions, I’d love to see a percentage of likes for each song, which would make it easy to tell the hits from the misses, and simplify running a focus group.

To their credit, Jango has added plenty of new features since I first wrote about it. Highlights include:

1. Custom promo module. You can now choose exactly what listeners see when your song plays. I’m using the “Facebook Likes” module, which connects directly to my Facebook page. It also includes a custom text link, plus icon links to web profiles and stores (you can see it at the top of this post).

2. Band Central. A new mini-site showcasing Airplay artists, sorted by genre, geography, or “popularity.” You’d think popularity would mean the number of fans, but it’s actually based on PopScore: a much-maligned metric of quality algorithmically derived from fan response.

3. The Jango Airplay Blog and how-to support links. The staff is much more accessible and social, and the site’s inner workings more transparent, than when the service first launched. The blog and how-to’s are full of tips and strategies, plus contests and weekly top 10’s. For example, one post walks you through creating a spoken audio intro for your songs. Great idea!

4. Royalties. This isn’t exactly a feature, but after much speculation I can now confirm that Jango does pay royalties. I received a whopping $13.23 from Jango via SoundExchange last quarter. Based on that low figure, my guess is that they only pay royalties on free “organic” plays, not paid plays through the Airplay program. Hey, it’s more than I got from Last.fm!

Though there’s still plenty of room for improvement, Jango is better than ever. I’ll continue to report back with my results. If you’d like to try it out for yourself, get 100 free spins and support the site by using my affiliate link.

For more information on Jango/Radio Airplay, see my previous articles:
The Jango Focus Group

Is Jango Payola?
What Artists Should Know About Jango

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107 Comments

  • Reply
    Jeff Shattuck
    November 29, 2011 at 4:38 pm

    Thanks for this update. I'm going to re-fire up my Jango efforts when my album is finally done, sometime in the next month.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    November 29, 2011 at 4:46 pm

    Keep me posted! I suggest a focus group, as described in my earlier article, to help decide what the opening track should be.

  • Reply
    Sam Page
    November 29, 2011 at 5:50 pm

    Thanks for another article on Jango, Brian! I don't know of a better way to get my music heard and to collect all kinds of useful data about it. Jango seems expensive until I consider what a campaign would cost (in terms of money and time) to get my music played on the radio… and there's no guarantee it would ever get played anyway. Grooveshark was doing something similar, but as far as I know they stopped.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    November 29, 2011 at 6:15 pm

    It appears Grooveshark is a sinking ship anyway. The experts think the lawsuit from Universal will shut them down.

  • Reply
    Sam Page
    November 29, 2011 at 6:43 pm

    A sinking fish more aptly? I couldn't resist . . . but I hadn't heard about that lawsuit. Very interesting! Have a good link to a story about that?

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    November 29, 2011 at 7:46 pm

    You bet. Here are a couple: http://bit.ly/uiZOyP http://bit.ly/sVJnGq

  • Reply
    Monty Singleton
    November 29, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    Love Jango! That and ReverbNation's Promote It are my favorite. My Jango fans have been better than my Promote It fans however when it comes to interaction.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    November 29, 2011 at 10:08 pm

    Interesting! Is that just anecdotal, or are you actively measuring it?

  • Reply
    Monty Singleton
    November 30, 2011 at 12:42 am

    Not actively measuring it, but pasively that seems to be the case.

  • Reply
    Sam Page
    November 30, 2011 at 6:47 am

    Thanks for those links. Get out the jam, because somebody's toast.

  • Reply
    Littleton Jones
    December 1, 2011 at 1:20 am

    270,000 listens for just under 2 grand sounds like a great investment to me. Don't know of any other site playing indy musicians next to signed artists that can match that deal. I understand that you got tons of free spins from your affiliate program (very clever btw). What kind of increase have you seen in your itunes sales since joining Jango? I listen to Pandora a lot and often purchase songs that I love via itunes (yes, I still pay for music). Would expect to see a significant increase in sales. Have you?

  • Reply
    Ken Avis
    December 1, 2011 at 5:30 am

    My experience has been similar. I like Jango for all the reasons you mention and I dislike the "hidden email" function and don't understand why Jango won't fix this by making it more apparent to users that they have a message. I dropped them a line, like you, with this suggestion months ago and the answer was…'we're looking into it'…then suddenly nothing happened.

    Our band, Veronneau, (www.VeronneauMusic.com) made it into the Jango Top 10 this week, pretty cool for a world-jazz band performing in multiple languages but despite all the fans…and I can't believe that the comments are fake…no one reads or responds to the messages we send through Jango.

    Great blog, by the way. I wouldn't have found or used Jango without your earlier write-up.

  • Reply
    Reggie Vaughn
    December 1, 2011 at 11:28 pm

    Hi there, I want to thank you for the info on Jango and air play, it would be nice to as well to give some how to for sound exchange for us novices.again thank you very much, very helpful.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 2, 2011 at 9:59 pm

    You're not the first to ask, and it's definitely on my list, though I don't consider myself an expert.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 2, 2011 at 10:01 pm

    Congratulations! I've never made the top 10. From what I've gleaned, the best tactic to get a high PopScore is to have your best song played as little as possible, and hope for a high percentage of likes. Still, I've never gotten above the low 90's, and typically I'm in the high 80's.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 2, 2011 at 10:04 pm

    Jango actually contacted me after my first article to offer the affiliate link, which has payed for more than half of my plays. It's probably more like a $5K investment when you factor that in.

    As for iTunes sales, I didn't see a sudden jump. There are so many factors though, the biggest being a new album release. I get played on Pandora as well, plus all my other crazy experiments. It's really hard to pinpoint the root cause of any particular sale.

  • Reply
    Ken Avis
    December 2, 2011 at 10:30 pm

    Brian Hazard I'm not quite sure what we did right! We didn't go for a lot plays last week when we got a popscore of 99 and Top 10 status. We had two songs running for about 120 plays each. Part of the week I premium targetted (Canada, Japan, UK and locally around our State). We had a high percentage of likes, though, for some reason a little bit higher than usual. We also had a song on the Christmas rotation so maybe that pushed a lot of people to our page?

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 3, 2011 at 12:07 am

    I could be wrong, but I think only paid plays count for PopScore. Most likely your targeting worked out really well, and the percentages happened to work in your favor. In my experience, a 10% like rate is really good, so if you chanced on 20%, you're a superstar.

  • Reply
    Matt Spire
    December 6, 2011 at 5:04 pm

    Thanks for all the useful info. I just signed us up this past week, and it seems to me that extrapolating meaning/performance from the stats is the hardest part. It seems like the "likes" and fan conversions are low compared to FB. Unfortunately, since we have a very specific sound (synthy punk music), I'm feeling like that market is saturated and need something new. I'll stick with it and see how it goes. It'd be useful if Jango shared the average like/fan conversion per play system-wide.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 7, 2011 at 10:38 pm

    I'd like to see that too, perhaps even as a substitute for PopScore, because that's probably what PopScore is based on anyway. I guess most artists get a weekly email with all-time likes shown, but I haven't gotten it for over a year because of a glitch in their system.

  • Reply
    Matt Spire
    December 7, 2011 at 10:55 pm

    Brian Hazard Well, at least you can still access that from Reports > Play Stats, but yes a derived percentage which can be compared to system averages would be great. Right now, after a week, I'm at about 2 likes per 100 hundred plays–doesn't sound particularly impressive! Makes me wonder if I should adjust my targeting or songs–but I have no idea how that performance stacks up.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 8, 2011 at 5:29 am

    I'd definitely mess around with targeting. My best songs consistently get above 10% likes. When I got scientific about it, my top song was at 14%.

  • Reply
    Matt Spire
    December 8, 2011 at 5:56 am

    Brian Hazard Yikes! Glad I asked. Even though I know we're kind of in a niche I know we can get a little closer to that, haha. Thanks. 🙂

  • Reply
    Sam Page
    December 8, 2011 at 5:36 pm

    Brian Hazard: 10-14%, wow. Do you use premium targeting to obtain those numbers? I'm happy when I attain 5%.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 9, 2011 at 3:12 am

    Nope, no premium targeting! Maybe electronic pop fans are more forgiving. 🙂

  • Reply
    Ken Jones
    February 5, 2012 at 8:11 pm

    Brian, have you noticed any changes in the Jango Airplay pop score system since they recently changed to their new look? Mine has gone down considerably (even with recently changing to Premium Targeting). Not sure if it's just a bad two weeks in a row, if they changed the pop score system, or something else. I've scored an average of 75 since I've been on there. Last 2 weeks I'm below 60. Wanted to get your 2 cents since you have been with Jango since the beginning.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 6, 2012 at 10:08 pm

    I haven't noticed a change on my end! I'm pretty much always in the mid-80's.

  • Reply
    Ken Jones
    February 6, 2012 at 10:52 pm

    OK thx

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 7, 2012 at 6:02 pm

    Just got the email for this week, 85. 🙂

  • Reply
    Ken Jones
    February 7, 2012 at 7:09 pm

    Must have been a bad couple wks in a row. Wondering if I'm overexposing certain songs? I swapped in a new song and it seems to be doing much better so far.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 7, 2012 at 10:46 pm

    Maybe! I notice that my percentages are down compared to when I first released the songs, but it hasn't seemed to have affected my scores.

  • Reply
    Alexis Gelinas
    February 21, 2012 at 6:48 am

    Ok my experience with Jango is as follows: I uploaded 4 songs and split 1000 play credits between the four. I got only got 9 fans with 1000 credits, so maybe I need to work on my targeting. :/

  • Reply
    Alexis Gelinas
    February 21, 2012 at 6:49 am

    And my pop score was 69. *shrug*

  • Reply
    Cory Blackford
    February 21, 2012 at 6:56 am

    You forgot the missile launcher and jetpack.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 21, 2012 at 4:40 pm

    I suggest taking whichever of the four songs that did best, allocating all future credits to it, and picking five (the minimum) targets – artists/bands who really mesh with what you're doing. If you can't get past 75 PopScore, I'd wait until you've got catchier material. It's tough to grab people on the first listen, but that's radio for you!

  • Reply
    Alexis Gelinas
    February 21, 2012 at 9:59 pm

    Brian Hazard actually this week my pop score was 89, so they gave me 100 free plays 🙂

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 21, 2012 at 11:48 pm

    Alright! Things are looking up. 🙂

  • Reply
    Mike Murray
    June 23, 2012 at 11:32 am

    Beginning to believe its a scam after receiving nothing but short, bland comments and zero responses to numerous mass mailings. I'm done…

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    June 27, 2012 at 11:30 pm

    I just got a comment on YouTube from someone who said they've been listening to me on Jango for a year now, and that sort of thing happens on a regular basis. The mass mailings and bulletins are completely useless, so you can't go by that. I suggest using email address shares as your metric.

  • Reply
    Michaela Burger
    June 28, 2012 at 8:08 am

    Hey Brian, thanks for your post! I was having a similar feeling that the 'fans' and 'likes' were just being made up! I haven't' bought any credits yet, my first free credits got used up in one day ; ) that's when I thought it might have been a scam. I'm still not 100% convinced and will keep looking into it. I do agree with the person below that 270,000 listens is great anyway, but where have these people gone? that's the biggest question…..thanks again ; ) Micha.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    June 28, 2012 at 4:02 pm

    Hopefully they are at least on our mailing lists! As of today, I've had 1118 Jango listeners share their email addresses with me. They are hard to track, but they occasionally buy my music direct, comment on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, etc.

  • Reply
    Anthony J. Quinn
    June 30, 2012 at 10:22 am

    The bottom line is wether sales are generated from Jango-enough to exeed the outlay for plays. One of the problems I see in this respect, is that if someone likes your song, they can just programme it on their radio station rather than buy it.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    June 30, 2012 at 3:12 pm

    There are countless ways for people to hear our music without paying for it. All my albums are freely streamable on my Bandcamp page. As difficult as it is to trace sales back to Jango, I think it's safe to say most of us pay out more than we take in, at least in the short term.

  • Reply
    Anthony J. Quinn
    June 30, 2012 at 8:44 pm

    Thank you Brian,

    Do you know if artists who are registered with the PRS and are on CD Baby will get any payments for organic plays on Jango? I'm getting quite a lot of organic plays-presumably by people who like my songs and want to hear them again. You may now have guessed why I made the point I did in my last post. If there is at least some payment back, I may carry on investing 30 dollars a month in the medium term at least.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    July 1, 2012 at 12:15 am

    In the US, SoundExchange collects those streaming royalties for organic plays. I don't have my statements handy, but it's not a whole lot! I suspect you should be due royalties too, but I don't know who collects them on your side of the pond.

  • Reply
    Onre Nobles
    August 4, 2012 at 1:51 pm

    I've always have like jango I've been there from the very start.

  • Reply
    Paul Levy
    November 5, 2012 at 5:58 pm

    Upcoming music artists are encouraged to participate in a campaign which will enable them to earn upto $1700 to boost their music career. You just need to follow the instructions and do the right thing. Read more in this website. http://www.mel6.com

  • Reply
    Kris Pierce
    December 15, 2012 at 1:27 pm

    I like the service. I spent $30 three months ago and I still get email sign ups and "likes." The reports on demographics definitely match the activity I get on social networks. I even did a test where I targeted bands I thought were more appropriate for my music, but didn't do nearly as well as when I followed the reports. My results have been on par with their claims, with about 2% turning into email signups. Compared to the $350 I spent on Google advertising, this program has a better ROI.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 18, 2012 at 2:01 am

    Glad to hear it's still working for you Kris! With their name change to Radio Airplay and overhaul, it's good to know the basic mechanics are still functional. As for me, I'm getting far less mailing list signups than I used to, but I keep chugging away.

  • Reply
    Michael Brown
    January 8, 2013 at 2:38 pm

    I think the best argument for Jango is not financial. It gives me very meaningful feedback and connections round the planet. That motivation is priceless….provided you keep some type of day job! 😉
    http://www.jango.com/music/This+Michael+Brown?l=0

  • Reply
    Caroline Krieger
    January 8, 2013 at 8:14 pm

    OK, I'm looking into this Jango thing… Read the atricle you posted, but still not fully uderstanding. Is this for anybody who wants to post music? Kind of like soundcloud??

  • Reply
    Caroline Krieger
    January 8, 2013 at 10:28 pm

    Figured it out 🙂

  • Reply
    Michael Brown
    January 9, 2013 at 2:26 pm

    Hey Caroline…..call anytime, i'll give you scoop…pretty decent deal i think….but am new to it….will keep you posted!

  • Reply
    Asa JustAsa
    January 31, 2013 at 11:29 pm

    Jango lives through the social aspect. If that is removed it will fail. Jango user since 2008 beta. Psst..it's me 🙂

  • Reply
    Mena Caetano
    January 31, 2013 at 11:58 pm

    yes, Asa is right! I love to listen to music while I can chat with my friends… you removed all them… I'm an old fan of Jango.. almost joined by the begining. Jango is loosing its interest! why did you delete all the pictures? and shouts? and comments?

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 1, 2013 at 5:56 pm

    Really? The social networking side seems weak and undeveloped to me. My guess is most users just leave the site open for background listening.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 1, 2013 at 5:58 pm

    Did Jango pare down the social stuff when it rebranded as Radio Airplay? I really don't explore that side.

  • Reply
    Asa JustAsa
    February 3, 2013 at 5:20 am

    Brian ,There comes a time in a mans life when he realizes he does not know everything. Sir your time has come.
    Your lack of a knowledgable basis for yourcomment shows a crass don't care except for me, attitude. Simplified?….engage brain ,before mouth. Oh yeah,and get an Agent with artists that are sucessful

  • Reply
    Kevin Dupree
    February 28, 2013 at 2:46 am

    yeah.. the artist to fan platform needs to be seriously fixed…The artist needs a better way to connect with its fans.. Cause clearly the current email / bulk email system is not the answer.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    March 1, 2013 at 12:47 am

    At least they allow fans to share their email address directly with the artist. I get a handful of these a week. A year or so ago, I'd get 2-3x as many!

  • Reply
    Charlie McCord
    May 9, 2013 at 8:34 pm

    It seems odd to pay to have your music played on internet radio. I guess if you get the organic plays enough it's worth it but I dunno.. I should try it and see for myself but it's just hard to justify spending money for listens.. I want to get paid for others listening..

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    May 10, 2013 at 12:04 am

    It does seem odd, but it beats paying for text or banner ads. At least people are hearing the music!

  • Reply
    Joe Sanchez
    May 16, 2013 at 10:07 pm

    Why do you have to pay $ for jango internet radio play when Justin Biber does not pay anything for this service.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    May 16, 2013 at 11:13 pm

    So your premise is that Justin Bieber has no promotion budget?

  • Reply
    Brian Oliver
    May 17, 2013 at 7:30 pm

    I'm not trying to be rude and I've never heard your music so this is a general comment, but some people that complain about Jango might want to really consider the quality of the music they're posting. If it's not competitive with the other artists being played, you're not gonna get fans and comments etc. I've been working with some really good hip hop artists and we've been experimenting with Jango Radio. It's showing some incredible results…people becoming fans on facebook, comments, twitter followers, people actually telling us they found us on Jango Radio, and much more. I think it's awesome!

  • Reply
    Bill Douglass
    May 23, 2013 at 9:24 pm

    Ya'll need to read this (link below)… I was a jango guy but I am now convinced, after similar experiences of a number of posters I have read online (no replies from 'fans', no music sales, standard one-word 'comments') that it is largely a computer-generated scam operation, with a few real fans mixed in to appear legit…
    http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/Radio-Airplay-aka-Jango/internet/Radio-Airplay-aka-Jango-DO-NOT-SPEND-1-WITH-THIS-SCAM-COMPANY-THEY-ARE-RIPPING-OFF-AR-1050532

  • Reply
    John JC Unger
    June 26, 2013 at 11:11 am

    They won't tell you when you're being played and where you can hear it! What good is that? That's what makes the whole thing smell bad.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    July 1, 2013 at 11:52 pm

    I'm not sure you understand the model John. It's individualized radio. Each person gets their own stream. It's not like terrestrial radio where thousands of people are listening to the same broadcast at the same time.

  • Reply
    Craig Gluck
    July 3, 2013 at 5:03 am

    Okay, followed your previous post to this one. Because we are about to hit 500 fans (from 50 different countries). We are ecstatic.. But is it fake? Are people given incentives for voting? Or did we earn fans the hard way? (i.e. actually having a great song and not looking like a fashion model).

    We do not sell our music. But we need to prove it is viable as we want to get into the weekend festival scene. If we can present stats like we have now, bookers cannot ignore us. So I go back to my first question.. Are the stats manipulated by Jango or are they legit? If manipulated, my band is screwed. If not.. DAMN.. I knew there was something right here.. But I do not want to present a booker with Jango stats, and he laughs them off.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    July 4, 2013 at 1:37 am

    Hey Craig, why don't you go to jango.com and set up a listener account? That's the easiest way to see how it works on that end. The stats are real, but a "fan" in Jango parlance just means someone who gave you a thumbs up, and 500 is just getting started. I've got 14K, but I've been at it for years. In any case, I wouldn't present Jango stats to a booker. They care about how many people you draw to a show.

  • Reply
    Craig Gluck
    July 10, 2013 at 6:17 am

    >> I wouldn't present Jango stats to a booker. They care about how many people you draw to a show.

    Yeah .. Of course they do.. Business is business after all.. But I would hope this is an opener..

  • Reply
    Royce White
    July 17, 2013 at 11:22 am

    Brian – thanks for taking the time and for your article. My expertise is marketing. As well, I've been in the music industry all my life. Further, I've spent thousands of dollars in Jango testing their service. As you've stated elsewhere, I believe in your first group of articles, you simply don't know if it's worth it. I concur. You need to be removed from the model because your spins are being paid for – no longer do you have skin in the game. Though I will accept your updates based on what is happening for some sort of promotion model. But more importantly, that is the case with 90% of the people involved – they simply don't know. And that's no way to run an advertising/marketing campaign, nor any way to build your following. "Well, I have nothing better to do with this $200 a month…" That's dangerous thinking and passive never beats active. There are many other methods (most of them physical) that put your music into potential fans hands. But that isn't the purpose of my response.

    It is incumbent on Jango to better connect with it's customers to help them understand more, to give them better ways to achieve. It is purely there for them to make money – which I have no problem with – it's a business, except that the credibility of the model and methodology is challenged by so many and so many more don't have a clue if their success comes directly from Jango or not. So it's a 'got no better place to spend my money" proposition. I'm sorry, but from a marketing perspective, that's just dumb. BECAUSE you are wasting time BELIEVING something is working that may or probably is not working. Better to go be proactive in your community, city, state and gig more often to build fans using the money for gas, but building serious fans you know face to face. I would venture that less than 2% of Jango's customers see any direct correlation. Not that it's not there (albeit it may not be), they just don't track it or understand it. And not that you can track a lot of it. The model is simply – too slippery and hard to track unless it's the ONLY thing you do to promote (including no facebook, no word of mouth, nothing else).

    Don't get me wrong – I would LOVE to see this model work – it just isn't there yet – may never be. And because it's confusing and they don't fix that, indicates quite frankly, they don't know if the model works. They do know it is paying their mortgage, their groceries, etc. and that the business idea is a good one. And I don't know if they are keeping people in the dark because once it hits the light the truth is known and it's not all that rosy (i.e. you're getting a return that is one half your investment – at best).

    So yes, it's one of the ONLY things that is available for indie's – but that doesn't mean it works. This may indicate why there are not many of these.

    To sum up, it's a poor excuse to spend money where you are unsure. Spend money to test, yes – set a budget – $500? $1000? But then find out, be incredibly diligent to understand IF you are making money at it. If you can't, what happens when you stop it for 3-6 months? Does anything change? If not, it was never a factor to begin with and you merely spent your money 'testing' to see if you should do it. DO NOT CONTINUE TO DO SOMETHING IF YOU CANNOT PROVE IT WORKS. Chances are all your other efforts are paying off. I want to see ANYONE who has tracked considerable sales to Jango. Or even relate-able sales! I'm not anti-Jango, I'm anti waste money for years at a time not knowing if it has any worth and you could be doing something else with your time and money and getting ahead for real. I've been doing this for 35+ years and if I told the people that pay me to do their marketing… "Uhhh, not sure that $50,000 campaign did any good," I wouldn't have any customers. It's okay to tell them the $50K didn't pull because of this demographic, or we narrowed what DOES work – we do that all the time BUT we make a decision and move on to what does make money.

    I want your feedback and others on this. I have nothing against Jango, BUT I do want to help musicians take what they have and who they are and give the labels a run for their money and really make it without the labels. And I don't believe the answer is Jango at the moment. Maybe I should start a forum on music marketing or a course for musicians on what TO do. I am a musician as well, and I have two sons that are full time musicians in different stages of their careers (rock and roll!). One was signed with the largest label in the world until we dumped them. Yep – we dumped them. I will NOT continue with what does NOT work, or what IS not working. I want to make it happen! Not wait for nothing to happen! Anyway, enough soapbox… Give me something solid – or try something else. That part is simple. I am very serious about this… I want the success of all good artists and the growth of those not there yet. My best to all.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    July 17, 2013 at 10:14 pm

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts in such detail Royce! I agree with a lot of what you've said, and could easily match you word for word addressing each of your points, but that time would be better spent on a new post (which is crazy overdue!).

    A few thoughts/clarifications though:

    1. I've got skin in the game. While the affiliate link has paid for some of my spins, I've paid for plenty (most?) myself. That said, I've recently let my campaigns expire. A very friendly Pandora rep contacted me for my input a couple months ago, and I found out I was getting over 10K plays per month there, which puts spending money on airplay in a different light.

    2. My results are better than "I don't know." I've detailed the case for why I think it's been worth it, and why the listeners are real people and that the whole thing isn't a sham operation, many times in the comments of my four posts on Jango. A decent percentage of my fanbase came from Jango, as I found from a survey I did a couple years back.

    3. "DO NOT CONTINUE TO DO SOMETHING IF YOU CANNOT PROVE IT WORKS." Fine, but define "work." Does that mean positive ROI? If so, can you point to any music promotion expense that "works" once you factor in an appropriate dollar amount per hour for your time? I can't. I made more money in sales 10 years ago with 10% of the fans. I don't think sales can be the sole metric. I prefer mailing list subscriptions.

    But like you said, spend money to test it. If you can't see the results, or the results you see aren't worth it, move on to something else. Might as well try Earbits too while you're at it, for comparison's sake.

    iTunes Radio might make the whole thing obsolete anyway.

  • Reply
    Brian Ashton
    July 21, 2013 at 6:16 pm

    I'm not against pay for play. That's the business today even for arena acts. But, I think it's fishy. I've noticed I get some song sales during my promotion period but I think it's jango staffers stringing me a long. It's genius they get $30 from me and pay $.01 to stream my song and make me feel like the promotion is effective. No one responds to my messages. None of them come over to my facebook page. Other fans respond, but not jango.
    And no, CDbaby said jango is pay for play therefore no royalties.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    July 21, 2013 at 10:04 pm

    You get royalties through SoundExchange for organic (non-paid) plays. Maybe a couple bucks for me all-time. I've had plenty of communication with Jango staffers over the years, and find the conspiracy theories pretty humorous. Don't forget they have to pay the staffers. Is it worth $30 to pay their employees to run a sham operation, and none of them have spoken out in years? You'll notice there's a customer support number in your control panel. Give them a call, tell them about your theory, and let me know what they say. Please? 🙂

  • Reply
    Royce White
    August 3, 2013 at 10:52 am

    Brian Hazard Thanks Brian. Appreciate the time. Define works. Can I point to any music promotion expense that "works"? That's a marketing cop out. Yes I can – in any venture I take on. Because I follow and track and evaluate. I spend the time. I do the homework. Most people don't – like 98% don't do the homework. That's a major part of why anyone is where they are today.

    YOU define what works. If you're getting what you want from your marketing campaign, you've done the homework and mapped it out, keep it going. In marketing, it's not so much do this don't do that, it's do all these things here in this order of importance. Where does Jango fall in priority? If you're spending hundreds of dollars and don't know / cannot see that it is paying off, THAT in itself is a good indication that it is potentially NOT – or at least that there are better ways to spend your time and money. So…….

    Do the math – do the work – ask your fans – find out. As done in engineering, let's look at the extremes. It doesn't matter if you got a fan for every spin you paid for! 100% response! If they are not buying your CD, not coming to your concert, not answering your email, not mentioning you to anyone, it's a total waste – even though it looks/sounds good at first blush. Conversely, if you got 1% response, but you are communicating reciprocally, selling, seeing, you can calibrate that and determine where it fits in the hierarchy of marketing tools.

    My guess is you are getting more response from these posts to your music and the whole Jango experience is being pushed by that. Fortuitously (?) I have an average of 5% response rate from all the different bands, songs, things done on Jango over a four year period. Yes I tested Jango seriously – very seriously. Still test it from time to time to see if there is a change. ALL of the people I talk to have the same 5% on average or less, but the median is 5%. That's a little too similar. I would love for others to post their response. Moreover, I would love for Jango to give some average statistics so WE CAN SEE HOW WE ARE DOING against one another. They don't for the obvious reason – and I mean no malice – it's business – I understand, but doing that is not advantageous to their model. So they don't. Understood. I got over it.

    Candidly, simply playing more gigs, being extremely aware, collecting marketing info and communicating with your fans, building locally to globally, and remembering that your band is a business and treating it like one, whether you agree or not, is one of the simplest and best things you can do. Common sense is not common practice. There's a lot of flurry on-line. Activity does not necessarily equal success. is it really paying off? Based on the mediocre response of most Jangoites and the feel of your original article, and more importantly the marketing tests we have done… the answer is currently no, it is not worth the investment. Except for the owners. But my guess is tat they are not making a killing either… Time to research that. Again, thanks for your time. My best…

  • Reply
    Sondra Goodlife
    August 17, 2013 at 11:12 pm

    jango has been remarkable, for indie download non-touring musicians for my.
    needs. I have to continue making it "easy" to BUY $$$ download, not just stream free..though.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    August 20, 2013 at 2:13 am

    It's tough to find the best performing free vs. paid balance. Can't say I've figured it out!

  • Reply
    Bradrick Cornish
    September 2, 2013 at 10:07 pm

    I signed up for RadioAirplay through a Tunecore offer for 100 free plays. Thought why not. I haven't bought any credits but have 400 total song plays. Found out a pop score of 90 or higher earns you 100 free plays. The people are real. I clicked on listeners facebook logo to add. One fan said she thought it was crazy I just listened to you on Jango. Its simple. If the music is hot people will sign up do to an interest in your work.
    .

  • Reply
    Terrence R. Hampton
    September 4, 2013 at 5:23 pm

    Bradrick Ill Affect Great way to advertise man lol. I'm following you just because of that

  • Reply
    Stephanie Reid
    December 22, 2013 at 2:57 pm

    I've been using Jango since 2009 and no idea I had an inbox until reading this post. lol. There are messages 4 years old that I never knew were there. :S

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    December 22, 2013 at 10:50 pm

    That makes me feel better Stephanie! Thank you. 🙂

  • Reply
    Paul R Marcano
    January 4, 2014 at 8:22 pm

    Brian Hazard Thanks so much for your indepth experience and opinion on Jango and thank you Royce for your feedback from your perspective as a someone in the music marketing industry. I recently joined Radio Airplay and am experiencing that initial enthusiasm of sharing my music with others. From an recording artist's perspective (not a touring artist) verifiable radio exposure is important and while I spent 18 months broadcasting my music over a 'real' radio show I had, it was more than impossible to tell if there were any listeners 'out there'. Jango is refreshing in the way it accumulates data on who and from where you are being heard. It would be nice to know if a song was listened to all the way through, even a partial listening gives an artist valuable feedback on their song writing. YouTube Analytics are very interesting to look at for that reason with my music videos. Jango could use something similar it would be provide compelling data well worth the $30/1000 listens. That said I think the service still helps an artist garner some exposure and possible feedback re: fans – from a promo cost it seems minimal at $1.00 a day for their $30 plan. Far more cost effective than running a CD promo on TV or Broadcast Radio ad that for an indie artist would likely at best result in a break even situation given the thousands involved in manufacturing CD and or producing the advertisement and then paying for airtime — given that digital downloads are becoming the most efficient way to distribute your music, Jango certainly provides some immediate results and a good chance people actually are hearing you. What's left is for the artist to produce a sound that succeeds in getting people to find your songs and albums and buy them. I joined a couple of days ago and have sold two album downloads already, so I expect my $30 investment will at least break even, the first month. Another thing for artists to consider is the way you can improve your songwriting and sound by listening to your songs within the context of a random stream of music you choose to associate your songs with. When I listen to my station as a remote member – I find it invaluable to analyse the audio in how my songs measure up when they do play within the playlist randomly after a particular song and then in contrast to whatever song follows. Musicians and song writers who are primarily recording artists will likely learn a lot about their efforts from listener feedback and what Radio Airplay is offering here. As a minimalist advertising option you control the budget and it seems to do what it claims – my initial impressions are good.

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    January 7, 2014 at 12:05 am

    Good stuff Paul! So you can trace those two sales back to Radio Airplay? If so, fantastic! I'm wondering how long the service can hold out in the face of iTunes Radio, Spotify, and other free – and superior, from a listening perspective – options.

  • Reply
    Kirk Richardson
    February 9, 2014 at 9:42 pm

    Why I Don't Use Jango *edit(AS MUCH)edit* Anymore; A Consumer Point of View

    I haven't been a a part of the music industry for almost 2 decades, Occasionally a promoter or band will contact me for networking and referral purposes but for all intents and purposes I am simply a consumer now.

    As a user I can offer some insight into what happens with the bulk mail box, I find it gets overloaded with post after post after post from the same artist, As a result, I find I pretty much ignore it. I have yet to see any activity in my email inbox, which I have shared with a select few artists who really blew my socks off. I would guess this would equal about 1 or 2% of my total likes (thumbs ups), the ones that make me feel like yeah, I have to send those guys (or gals) a comment. I know what it's like to be struggling to get your music out there, or trying to get others music out there, and often one encouraging message can make a huge difference. So I like to give recognition to the folks that really seem to connect with my musical vibe.

    I don't know how their (Jango) algorithm works in terms of deciding what artist to play to me, but I find more often than not the genre does NOT match what I am currently listening to. This is very annoying to me to go from listening to something hard and thrashing to something that sounds like Yanni, Strawberry Alarm Clock or Kenny G (nothing wrong with Jazz or light Jazz, I like both genres, And Strawberry Alarm Clock was amazing, just not sandwiched in between Slayer and Venom you know what I mean?). I don't know if this is because musicians are adding genres to their music that it doesn't really belong to, or just a crappy algorithm, but it is annoying, and a waste of the artists advertising dime IMHO.

    Now lately I also notice some songs by certain mainstream artists don't sound the way they are supposed to. Is this because the bitrate has been adjusted for copyright purposes, or that they are in fact performed by other artists for similar reasons? I don't know.

    For these reasons I find myself turning to grooveshark more and more (Pandora was pulled in Canada due to licensing restrictions) which is a shame, because I really prefer the Jango model. I like being exposed to new music and new artists (so long as they fit in with the sound of my current selected genre/style) and I think it is an awesome way to give newer bands a way to get exposure they wouldn't normally get locally. Grooveshark just doesn't seem to have this ability at the current time. I also find I have to manually add music to my stations to get a decent play stream, the algorithm is not as robust with it.

    I would love to continue with Jango, but a combination of songs that don't sound right (I have an ear for music, perfect pitch, it's a blessing and a curse) and mini band commercials that don't fit with my music stream (and I LOVE the ones that do usually) have really turned me off the whole experience.

    Just my own observations and opinion, YMMV

  • Reply
    Brian Hazard
    February 10, 2014 at 4:06 am

    Really helpful Kirk! Thanks so much for sharing your experience.

    I agree that there are many better options today, as both a listener and artist. Why someone would bother with Radio Airplay over Spotify (even free, with commercials) or even iTunes Radio is beyond me.

    • Reply
      Jim Bauersfeld
      October 22, 2014 at 6:56 pm

      Hi,
      wondering what you still thought about radio airplay /Jango…recently I have noticed less fans coming my way,and was wondering you know how quickly things change in the world today,this sort of reminded me when I was doing real well on MYSPACE back in the day,then that started getting less and less listens,I remember asking my Son,people still into Myspace ,thats when he had to tell me the bad news….MYSPACE was not happening anymore,wasn’t cool. I really like radio airplay/jango,i didn’t spend a whole lot on it,did the 30 dollar a month plan….was wondering if there are other internet radio stations people are going to?

      • Reply
        Brian Hazard
        October 24, 2014 at 7:03 pm

        Thanks for the comment Jim!

        I haven’t invested in Radio Airplay for some time, though I was invited a few months ago to try out some of the new features and write a new article. Neither of us have followed up, but if/when that happens, I’ll give it another shot!

        I’ve also let my Earbits credits run out. I’ve been messing around with Feature.fm but haven’t had enough experience to draw any conclusions. Finally, I just partnered with Mad Genius Radio for a promotional campaign It’s really artist-friendly, but doesn’t have any sort of pay-to-play mechanism that I know of.

  • Reply
    Kirk Richardson
    February 10, 2014 at 4:29 am

    Brian Hazard Glad I could help, I will of course keep going back to Jango because far and away they offer the best hands free experience, fire and forget. I will just not use it all the time as I once would.

  • Reply
    dave cooper
    January 4, 2015 at 4:39 am

    Nearing two weeks of radio airplay testing and there’s just one hell of a big flaw in the system. There is a high percentage of folks who will never press a like button or be a fan, but they will listen again and again to your music. The only way to currently track this is to enter every spin into a word processor and use the find/search to track how many times a name shows up. For the 60 odd ‘fans’ I’ve secured so far, there are over 220 of what I call ‘repeaters’ and I’m only 80% done working the list. A number of them have been back 4,5 and 6 times. And I’ve had to put the system on the slowest airplay plan to find the time to write up and work the list.

    You should be able to click on any profile among your listeners and get a page with just their hits – when they listened and what they heard. NONE of the ‘fans’ had ever listened before – all first time listeners – and only 10% came back for a second listen so far and less than 8% left an email address. How does that rate against someone who’s listened to your stuff six times in six days? Yet you receive no credit for all the repeaters.

    Now I don’t care about free spins or pop scores, I care about data, that’s why I’m spending money with them. You’re deluded if you think a service dedicated to free music will increase your album sales. And if the data package cannot include repeating listeners then it is cheating your out of the most valuable data and some other portal will figure that out and offer it.

    For those who think it’s a scam, I have a great way to test your theory. Once you’ve accumulated a list of several thousand spins, you can compare your list to others using the same star comparisons. If you find the same sequences of listeners, its a bot operation. Anyone want to trade data? PS – I think it’s on the level, but there is a way to check.

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      January 6, 2015 at 5:25 pm

      Three cheers for the scientific method Dave!

      Since Radio Airplay is a “lean back” platform, it makes sense to me that people are listening over and over without interacting. They probably leave it on at work or as background music.

      Whether they’ll eventually stop and wonder who that artist they keep hearing is, I don’t know. It’s hard to say where iTunes sales come from, but you’re right that they aren’t bound to be the type of fans you’re going to establish a close relationship with.

      Personally, I haven’t used the platform in some time. I was invited to test out some new features, which I agreed to, but I have yet to hear back. For now, I don’t see the point in playing for plays when I get many more on Pandora for free.

    • Reply
      mik303
      January 9, 2016 at 10:19 am

      Hi Dave and Brian,

      I have been doing some pretty deep research into radio airplay and their statistics. Personally, I used the service every month in 2015 and have even written an article about NeuCoin and Jango, with some suggestions for better statistical reporting.

      https://twitter.com/303infinity_EDM/status/685577673582768128

      Please contact me. I would love to work on a new article and am willing to share all of my RadioAirplay statistics with you and see if we can come up with similar data. My music gets plenty of streams and downloads online, but tracking how much of that activity has actually come from radio airplay is something that I am still researching.

      • Reply
        Brian Hazard
        January 23, 2016 at 3:34 pm

        Great article Mike! I’ve got one in the works as well. I’ll tweet you.

  • Reply
    dave cooper
    January 7, 2015 at 5:37 am

    Do you receive from Pandora a running list of usage with identifiers as you do with Radio Airplay? I posted an idea for their data on our Sun Arrow Records Facebook – basically a graph where the horizontal is spins and the vertical is repeat listeners. Angle of ascent would show how hot your response was in getting repeat listeners and it could roll over time like a real estate value graph. Obviously, same technique could be applied to any such data stream, so do you receive the same type of data back from Pandora or just stripped data with no identifiers?

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      January 7, 2015 at 8:51 am

      Nothing that fancy. It’s just the number of spins the a percentage of thumbs-up. Repeat listens are largely based on Pandora’s algorithms rather than listeners’ desires, I would think.

      Sign up for Pandora AMP here: https://amp.pandora.com

  • Reply
    Al Kerr
    August 25, 2015 at 2:06 pm

    Hi

    How do you know whats been played on jango to claim royalties .The email they sent me says they DO NOT PROVIDE at time/date of play service for my songs

  • Reply
    Dany Lynen
    December 17, 2015 at 5:37 pm

    I believe Jango is the best way to promote your original music. Although I have released some of my music I know for a fact that the majority of people who like an artist are downloading their music for free on all the major websites like Youtube. So this is still the best way to get people throughout the world to know who the hell you are!

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      December 18, 2015 at 4:34 pm

      Glad to hear it Dany! I’m trying it out again after a long hiatus, and there are tons of improvements. For one, listeners’ Facebook profiles are linked, so now there’s no question whether or not they are “real”.

  • Reply
    James Cox
    April 28, 2016 at 11:13 am

    There can hardly be a conspiracy to bilk starving artists out of their riches.
    What kind of business model would THAT be? (“I’m gonna fix it to sucker all the artists out of their entire monthly ad budget – all $47 dollars for each of em!”) Nope, Any business could bilk more $$$ out of 11 year old girls spending daddy’s go-away-and-shut-up handout money, than a business is ever going to get out of purposefully trying to take away all of your $$$. All $12.49 that you have for the rest of the month.
    No, you only expose your own hubris when you self-inflate your sense of purpose and worth when you fantasize that big bad Jango (or fill in the blank) is designed to get filthy rich by stealing from those who don’t have to steal from.

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      April 29, 2016 at 7:09 pm

      So in other words, you think the idea that Radio Airplay is a scam is ridiculous, and couldn’t possibly be the foundation of a successful business. I concur!

  • Reply
    Harry Versluijs
    August 1, 2016 at 11:05 am

    This is very interesting reading Brian. My age (65) and serious health issues kept me from working at all, so I buy the smallest monthly package. From my point of view 10 dollars is not much for a bit of space on a site that is at least talked about. Listening to it by the way is fun too. THANKS for sharing you thoughts, for now it made me decide to hang on. Many good points like the blogs etc. Worth considering. I’ll hang on to Jango!

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      August 2, 2016 at 5:04 pm

      Glad to hear it Harry! You’re right, $10 a month isn’t a whole lot to keep a track or two in rotation. For me, that can be the difference between feeling like I’m doing something vs. nothing to promote my music.

  • Reply
    Billy Albritton
    August 14, 2016 at 4:29 pm

    Brian, I just signed up for the $50/month plan for my band JoEveritt. And over the last week the traffic to my bands site http://www.WeLikeToRock.com and our youtube has increased over 100%. And this radio airplay is the only thing I’ve changed aside from learning how to properly use SEO. I am completely sure that this extra traffic is from linking my accounts to my airplay profile. Aside from being able to check actual peoples profile when I get my listers update. Thanks for the great article. Maybe you’ll check out my music and my website. I’ll be bookmarking yours. I’m definitely jealous of your stats, and thinking of upgrading my plays per month!

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      August 14, 2016 at 5:33 pm

      Thanks for the kind words! I’m glad you’re so optimistic about your newfound traffic. Personally, I haven’t seen much from Radio Airplay in my Google Analytics. Do you have that set up? I wouldn’t discount the benefits of SEO.

      • Reply
        Billy Albritton
        August 16, 2016 at 6:03 am

        I have Google Analytics setup on my personal music website (www.weliketorock.com). And being that it is basically a landing page to all of my music links (cd baby, itunes, amazon, etc.) there isn’t much room for SEO optimization. It’s setup like a blog, but I don’t really blog. Although, here lately I’ve ben rethinking that aspect of it.

  • Reply
    Billy Albritton
    August 16, 2016 at 6:06 am

    Since writing last time, I also upped it to the $100/month plan. I like seeing my music being played all day long. And because I have my website, and my youtube page both linked to my Jango profile, my plays on YouTube are going up quickly as well. I’m using the video promotion through Jango which shows one of our videos. I’ve also been wondering about how I can connect to all my listeners, do you have a facebook music profile? I’m wondering if I should start sending a link to my band page through facebook to all of my listeners since I can see their names and go directly to their facebook from my Radio Airplay account.

    • Reply
      Brian Hazard
      August 16, 2016 at 5:59 pm

      That’s great to hear!

      Yes, I have a Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/colortheory

      I haven’t tried contacting Radio Airplay listeners through Facebook, because my guess is they don’t know their profile was shared with us. They could be in for a very creepy surprise!

      In the future, you might want to comment on my latest Radio Airplay post from just a couple months ago. I’d guess we’ll see a lot more engagement from other RA users over there.

      http://passivepromotion.com/radio-airplay

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